Oldest cocktails in the world

Oldest cocktails in the world

By 1806, The Balance and Columbia Repository magazine in New York defined the term cocktail as a combination of water, sugar, bitter drink, and liquor.

Here are some of the oldest and most classic cocktails in the world:

 

Old-Fashioned 

Old fashioned classic cocktail

What do you need?

Sugar

Angostura bitters

Water

Bourbon

Garnish: Orange peel

 

History

Classic recipe credited with creating Colonel James E. Pepper and originating from the Pendennis Club, an exclusive gentlemen’s club in Louisville, Kentucky. In 1880 the term Old Fashioned was born since the fashion of “drinking the old way” became popular, making this the name of the cocktail.

 

Sazerac

What do you need?

Absinthe

Sugar cube

Coldwater

Peychaud’s bitters

Angostura bitters

Whiskey

Cognac

Garnish: lemon peel 

 

History

An apothecary, Antoine Peychaud Jr, begins brewing his father’s secret recipe and begins making medicinal bitters in the French Quarter of New Orleans at his pharmacy called Pharmacie Peychaud. From this recipe came the “Peychaud Bitters” and he began selling in his pharmacy a punch he called “medicinal tonic”, which contained his bitters mixed with Sazerac de Forge et Fils cognac and sweetened with a sugar cube. He then began to call the Sazerac cocktail.

 

Pisco Sour

What do you need?

Pisco

Lime juice

Simple syrup

Egg white

Garnish: Angostura bitters

 

History 

It was created approximately in 1916 by Víctor Morris, owner of the Morris Bar and he made a version of the Whiskey Sour by combining pisco and lemon juice, egg white, and rubber syrup.

 

 

Manhattan

What do you need? 

Whiskey

Sweet Vermouth

Angostura bitters

Orange bitters

Garnish: Brandied cherry or lemon twist

 

History

The origin of this cocktail is based on legends. One of the most assertive legends is that the recipe originated in the Manhattan Club in New York for a special occasion.

 

 

Mint Julep

What do you need?

Mint leaves

Simple syrup

Bourbon

Garnish: Mint Sprig

Garnish: Angostura bitters

 

History

The origin of this cocktail goes back centuries to the Middle East where there was an Arabic drink made with water and rose petals called Gulab. Julep is derived from this word and once the drink was introduced to the Mediterranean countries they began to replace the rose petals with mint leaves.

 

 

Gin Fizz

Tropical Gin Fizz Cocktail

What do you need?

Gin

Lemon Juice

Simple syrup

Egg white

Club soda 

 

History

Created by Henry C. Ramos in 1888, at his bar The Imperial Cabinet Saloon in New Orleans. The word Fizz comes from the sound it makes when adding soda.

 

 

Sidecar

What do you need?

Cognac

Orange liqueur (Cointreau

Lemon Juice

Garnish: Orange Twist

Garnish: Sugar Rim

 

History

The origin of this cocktail is not clear, however, everything indicates that its origin comes from Paris or London and that it was created during the First World War.

 

 

Gin Rickey

Fresh lime drinks macro shot

What do you need?

Gin

Lime Juice

Club soda

Garnish: Lime Wheels

 

History

Around 1880 in Washington D.C. a bartender along with Democratic lobbyist Colonel Joe Rickey created a drink by combining bourbon, lime juice, simple syrup, and a little soda. A decade later it became popular when it was mixed with gin.

 

 

Aviation

What do you need?

Gin

Maraschino liqueur

Creme de Violette

Lemon juice

Garnish: Brandied cherry

 

History

By the beginning of the 20th century, aviation began to revolutionize the world. This cocktail emerges as an authentic tribute to that moment in history.

 

 

Blue Blazer

What do you need?

Sugar

Angostura bitters

Water

Bourbon

Orange peel

 

History

Blue Blazer was created by Jerry Thomas at the end of the 18th century. Thomas was a master of showmanship who made it clear that in this profession of cocktail making it was important to expose the work to the client in the form of a show.